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hey remember when the doctor hated guns? doctor who amy pond rory williams river song

Some brief thoughts about Amy Pond & River Song

femfreq:

This article “Why This Year’s Doctor Who Finale Was (Mostly) Better than Last Year’s” by Charlie Jane Anders (io9) has some interesting thoughts about River and Amy’s characters.

SPOILERS

“River Song was such a shiny character, full of endless possibility, and she hit her high point in some of the early Matt Smith stories. Jumping out of spaceships in flight, carving messages in ancient cliffs, and generally being badass and mysterious. Now, it seems like her mystery is gone, and it’s been replaced by… I can hardly bear to type the words.”

“So in order to get River to restart the universe and set things right, the Doctor has to marry her — you’ll notice the Doctor never says he loves her, and he makes fun of her for saying she loves him. Soon afterwards, the Doctor tells River, “I don’t want to marry you.” And then, right before he does marry her, he tells her, “You embarrass me,” and he genuinely seems to be full of loathing for her in that moment. During the actual quickie wedding ceremony, River asks, “What am I doing?” and the Doctor replies, “as you’re told.” Awwww… so romantic. Finally, the Doctor tells her, “Now you’re the woman who marries me,” as if she’s won the jackpot.”

“Meanwhile, there’s Amy. It’s now safe to say that the Silence didn’t brainwash Amy to stop caring about the fact that she’ll never see her baby (as a baby) again — she just got over it really, really quickly.”

“In today’s episode, Amy finally does deal with the fact that her baby was stolen and abused by monsters, by inflicting a painful death on the bubble-universe version of Madame Kovarian. It’s a nice enough moment, but no substitute for seeing Amy actually deal with the enormity of what’s happened to her child. After two seasons, Amy remains a bit of a cartoon character-“

I really have to agree with both of these sentiments, first I was really troubled with how Amy vengefully assisted the murder of Madame Kovarian.  While there was some relief at the end of the episode when Amy speaks about her shame for her actions there is really, hardly any discussion about the emotional ramifications of having your BABY STOLEN! If there was any doubt that Amy’s pregnancy was a Mystical one, then this is further proof. 

While I enjoy Amy, and in fact really adored her in the fifth season, I completely agree about the cartoonish aspects.  The writers haven’t really developed her character much at all and we have very little reason to really care about Amy or even like her that much other than the snarky jokes.  Plus this latest season met with way too many “Save Amy” moments to describe her as empowered.

I don’t really have issues with Amy killing Kovarian. Amy has always been more interested in shooting first and asking questions later and she’s always been driven by her emotions. In the dream world, when Rory died last series, she made the choice to kill herself and the doctor because she didn’t want to live in a world where Rory didn’t exist. Not because she knew it was a dream. She did the same when she shot the astronaut, only to later realize there was a little girl inside. So when faced by the woman who took her daughter and turned her into the woman who would murder Amy’s best friend…it made sense for her character that Amy would be that ruthless. 

What I take issue with is the fact that we didn’t see the development of Amy’s pain over the loss of her daughter until that scene. Amy was clearly traumatized when the ganger!Melody burst into goo all over her shouler at the end of ”A Good Man Goes to War”, but after that, she and Rory just accepted that River was gone and there was nothing they could do about rescuing her? We had 6 or 7 episodes after “A Good Man” in which Amy, Rory, and the Doctor went on all sorts of adventures and Amy and Rory never once mentioned, even in passing, that their daughter was still out there somewhere being psychologically conditioned into some sort of killing machine. That emotional distance made Amy’s anger harder to believe. I found the finale in general really hard to connect to emotionally and I think it’s because of the way Amy, Rory, and River’s relationships with one another were handled. So many huge things happened to all three of them this season and those huge, life-changing events didn’t seem to have any impact on them as characters unless it was relevant to the plot. It would have been a lot easier to believe how ruthless Amy was in killing Kovarian if we had seen the emotional development of her relationship with River (or the development of her anger over the fact that she doesn’t have a solid relationship with her daughter because her daughter was taken from her) over the course of the season. 

(Also the rest of that article from io9 is really great and I think everyone should read it.)

Amy Pond River Song Television review doctor who this has been an opinion

"You took my baby away from me and you hurt her and now she’s all grown up and she’s fine."

Really, Amy? She’s FINE

Have you MET River Song? She’s not fine at all! She’s been traumatized into thinking that this Doctor who she’s only met a few times is the love of her life, so much so that she’s willing to sacrifice the rest of time itself to avoid the pain of being in a world without him.

If there is one complaint I have about this series of Doctor Who it’s Amy and Rory’s parenting skills. They care very much about their baby in A Good Man Goes to War, but once she’s gone, they hardly mention her for the rest of the series up until the finale. I think we’re supposed to accept that because they knew River before they knew she was their daughter, they never felt that it was in their power to raise her as their own…but I find that very hard to believe.

I get that it’s a wibbly-wobbly time travel trip and Amy and Rory are used to shit like this happening, but it was strange how quickly they accepted that River was their daughter and that they “raised” her as their friend Mels. River as an adult is smart, she’s sharp, she has great instincts but she is not someone who I would consider stable or emotionally well-adjusted. 

Amy and Rory were LIVID when the Doctor didn’t save Melody in A Good Man Goes to War, and then what…they find out that she’s already an adult in the future (as are ALL kids) but because they already know her in their past, they decide they don’t need to go save her anymore? You’d think that because Amy and Rory know that their daughter becomes a murderer, they’d want to go and save her as an infant to prevent her from growing up apart from them and conditioned into an assassin by a religious order. I don’t get it!

doctor who the more i think about it the angrier i get river song amy pond rory williams
doctor who rory williams amy pond
spectroscopes:

In “The Eleventh Hour”, the adult Amy chooses the name ‘Amy Pond’ for herself — rejecting the Doctor’s favoured name for her, Amelia Pond, which she associated with the childhood she left behind when the Doctor broke his promise to her — and she continues to go by ‘Amy Pond’ after she marries Rory in “The Big Bang”. This is the name she has chosen for herself, as part of the adult identity she has created for herself. This is why it’s so disgusting that the Doctor frames ‘Amy Pond’ as a name which Amy has to shed in order to become an adult. It’s not a question of whether Amy is ‘allowed’ to take her husband’s name — of course she is, and if Amy had chosen to go by ‘Amy Williams’ when she married Rory in “The Big Bang” there would have been nothing contentious about it — but Amy did not take Rory’s name in this episode: it was bestowed upon her by the Doctor, as part of an ‘adult’ identity which he created and defined for her. Amy implicitly rejected the name of ‘Williams’ when she kept going by ‘Pond’ after “The Big Bang”, and she explicitly rejected it when she chose to name her daughter Melody Pond. The fact that this episode frames ‘Amy Williams’ specifically — the identity she’s expected to assume by the patriarchy as a holdover from a time when women were quite literally the property of their husbands — as the identity that Amy has to assume in order to be a grown-up (the fact that it associates her maiden name of ‘Pond’ with immaturity, as if her decision to keep her maiden name when she got married was nothing more than a childish whim) is almost a tangential detail, merely the icing on the misogynistic subtext cake. It’s not the name itself that’s the problem: it’s what it means specifically within the context of Amy’s storyarc. Doctor Who conflated the adoption of your husband’s surname with the idea of growing up. That’s the problem.
Review: Doctor Who 6.11, “The God Complex”

spectroscopes:

In “The Eleventh Hour”, the adult Amy chooses the name ‘Amy Pond’ for herself — rejecting the Doctor’s favoured name for her, Amelia Pond, which she associated with the childhood she left behind when the Doctor broke his promise to her — and she continues to go by ‘Amy Pond’ after she marries Rory in “The Big Bang”. This is the name she has chosen for herself, as part of the adult identity she has created for herself. This is why it’s so disgusting that the Doctor frames ‘Amy Pond’ as a name which Amy has to shed in order to become an adult. It’s not a question of whether Amy is ‘allowed’ to take her husband’s name — of course she is, and if Amy had chosen to go by ‘Amy Williams’ when she married Rory in “The Big Bang” there would have been nothing contentious about it — but Amy did not take Rory’s name in this episode: it was bestowed upon her by the Doctor, as part of an ‘adult’ identity which he created and defined for her. Amy implicitly rejected the name of ‘Williams’ when she kept going by ‘Pond’ after “The Big Bang”, and she explicitly rejected it when she chose to name her daughter Melody Pond. The fact that this episode frames ‘Amy Williams’ specifically — the identity she’s expected to assume by the patriarchy as a holdover from a time when women were quite literally the property of their husbands — as the identity that Amy has to assume in order to be a grown-up (the fact that it associates her maiden name of ‘Pond’ with immaturity, as if her decision to keep her maiden name when she got married was nothing more than a childish whim) is almost a tangential detail, merely the icing on the misogynistic subtext cake. It’s not the name itself that’s the problem: it’s what it means specifically within the context of Amy’s storyarc. Doctor Who conflated the adoption of your husband’s surname with the idea of growing up. That’s the problem.

Review: Doctor Who 6.11, “The God Complex”

(Source: formerlyspectroscopes)

doctor who the god complex this was a great episode but this really bothered me amy pond rory williams
doctor who the girl who waited spoilers amy pond rory williams

Absolutely *BRILLIANT* Interview with Steven Moffat at The Daily Beast

doctorwho:

The Daily Beast has a *BRILLIANT* interview with Steven Moffat where he answers a lot of questions/comments/complaints about everything from how he plans the plot, series-long arcs, and what happens when one day he, Matt, Karen, and Arthur decide to move on.  It’s a must read.

For example:

It was revealed that River Song is the daughter of companions Amy and Rory (Arthur Darvill). Is this the solution you had in mind when you first introduced her in “Silence in the Library” back in Season 5?

Not quite…It came about from the most practical reason: I had to have the Doctor in a library…and a bunch of archaeologists had to find him and not immediately arrest him for the crime. The psychic paper wouldn’t cover it, so I thought, What if one of the archaeologists knows him?…But then I thought, What if one of the archaeologists knows him, but he doesn’t know the archaeologist? Suddenly, that’s quite cool. What if it’s a woman? What if it’s a woman who flirts with him in a rather proprietary way? Then a whole story explodes in your head…She might be his wife, or a girlfriend, or there’s a romantic attachment there.

When I introduced Amy Pond, it was with the possibility that this could be the mother of River, and that’s why I put the “Pond” in…There was no guarantee that Karen [Gillan] was going to stay or that Alex [Kingston] would come back. It was just a possibility that I kept alive.

We’re still reading it. We’ll probably post more quotes from it as we come across them.

The way Moffat’s mind works will never cease to amaze me. 

doctor who steven moffat interview the daily beast amy pond river song
"Donna was my favorite. She was loud and opinionated and made fun of the Doctor a lot and was capable of becoming extremely—and convincingly—shouty when she did not support the Doctor’s intended course of action. Unlike Martha, she wasn’t devastatingly intelligent; unlike Rose, she didn’t win the Doctor’s heart. She never even tried to get in his pants. She was just this normal, originally kind of shallow girl, who found out there was a lot more to life than she’d ever realized. I’m not arguing that Donna was a flawless character—she crossed the line from “brassy and awesome” into “stereotypical shrew” more often than I would have liked—but she was flawed in a way that felt real to me. And I’d still prefer Donna at her worst to what we got after her, any day of the week. Because what we got, after her, was Amy."

Tiger Beatdown › The Girl Who Waited: Why I Hate Amy Pond

This is one of the best analyses of the companions that I’ve ever read.

I feel like there’s a lot about Amy’s character that has been annoying me on a subconscious level since the beginning of season 5 (the ease with which she could cheat on Rory one second and turn around and berate him for being rightfully suspicious the next, for one) but I could never quite pinpoint what it was because she has such a spunky, likable personality and Eleven’s stories are just so good. But having all the companions laid out this clearly, my opinion of Amy and her characterization has dropped rather quickly and my love for Donna, if anything, has grown. 

I’ve heard people accuse Moffat of sexism before and I never really understood why until now. I don’t think it’s something he does intentionally, but regardless…Moffat, I love you and you write some fantastic stories, but you need to be better at writing legitimately strong female characters. Please?

steven moffat amy pond doctor who Donna Noble rose tyler Martha Jones this has been an opinion
The Doctor’s Companions: An Infographic (via Nerdist)
Click the link for the high-res version.
[Warning: Spoilers if you haven’t seen the most recent episode]

The Doctor’s Companions: An Infographic (via Nerdist)

Click the link for the high-res version.

[Warning: Spoilers if you haven’t seen the most recent episode]

doctor who infographic donna noble river song amy pond rory williams rose tyler martha jones jack harkness companions Sarah Jane Smith

“It wasn’t just because he knew how much the TARDIS meant to the Doctor. Rory knew what it was like, or at least mostly what it was like, to have what he loved most in the world tied up in a form he couldn’t communicate with, in a big old box he could talk with but that would never talk back, that he could do nothing for except try and protect, for even longer than the Doctor has been with the TARDIS.  
So when the TARDIS matrix is reintegrating into the ship, Rory wasn’t just seeing how horrible it was for the Doctor, in the way that Amy was, in that human way that’s compassionate and wonderful but could never truly begin to comprehend the way the Doctor must feel, but Rory was also thinking about, if after all of that, what if Amy had to go back in the Pandorica? Back in that box? How horrible it would feel, but how much he’d still love her and do everything in his power to protect her? So I think when Rory’s tearing up, it isn’t just because he loves and admires the Doctor and is sympathizing with him, but because he’s empathizing with him, because he understands in that moment how he feels, more than anyone else in the universe probably could.”

“It wasn’t just because he knew how much the TARDIS meant to the Doctor. Rory knew what it was like, or at least mostly what it was like, to have what he loved most in the world tied up in a form he couldn’t communicate with, in a big old box he could talk with but that would never talk back, that he could do nothing for except try and protect, for even longer than the Doctor has been with the TARDIS.  

So when the TARDIS matrix is reintegrating into the ship, Rory wasn’t just seeing how horrible it was for the Doctor, in the way that Amy was, in that human way that’s compassionate and wonderful but could never truly begin to comprehend the way the Doctor must feel, but Rory was also thinking about, if after all of that, what if Amy had to go back in the Pandorica? Back in that box? How horrible it would feel, but how much he’d still love her and do everything in his power to protect her? So I think when Rory’s tearing up, it isn’t just because he loves and admires the Doctor and is sympathizing with him, but because he’s empathizing with him, because he understands in that moment how he feels, more than anyone else in the universe probably could.”

(Source: empressfab)

doctor who Rory Williams eleventh doctor amy pond the last centurion TARDIS
doctor who amy pond river song Rory Williams rose tyler Martha Jones Donna Noble

(Source: -everdeen)

hahahahahahahaha amy pond Rory Williams river song doctor who awkward moment
amy pond Rory Williams the last centurion doctor who
robin-sparkles:


I shouldn’t let it get to me, but it still does.

“It wasn’t just because he knew how much the TARDIS meant to the Doctor. Rory knew what it was like, or at least mostly what it was like, to have what he loved most in the world tied up in a form he couldn’t communicate with, in a big old box he could talk with but that would never talk back, that he could do nothing for except try and protect, for even longer than the Doctor has been with the TARDIS.  
So when the TARDIS matrix is reintegrating into the ship, Rory wasn’t just seeing how horrible it was for the Doctor, in the way that Amy was, in that human way that’s compassionate and wonderful but could never truly begin to comprehend the way the Doctor must feel, but Rory was also thinking about, if after all of that, what if Amy had to go back in the Pandorica? Back in that box? How horrible it would feel, but how much he’d still love her and do everything in his power to protect her? So I think when Rory’s tearing up, it isn’t just because he loves and admires the Doctor and is sympathizing with him, but because he’s empathizing with him, because he understands in that moment how he feels, more than anyone else in the universe probably could.” — Kati

robin-sparkles:

I shouldn’t let it get to me, but it still does.

“It wasn’t just because he knew how much the TARDIS meant to the Doctor. Rory knew what it was like, or at least mostly what it was like, to have what he loved most in the world tied up in a form he couldn’t communicate with, in a big old box he could talk with but that would never talk back, that he could do nothing for except try and protect, for even longer than the Doctor has been with the TARDIS.  

So when the TARDIS matrix is reintegrating into the ship, Rory wasn’t just seeing how horrible it was for the Doctor, in the way that Amy was, in that human way that’s compassionate and wonderful but could never truly begin to comprehend the way the Doctor must feel, but Rory was also thinking about, if after all of that, what if Amy had to go back in the Pandorica? Back in that box? How horrible it would feel, but how much he’d still love her and do everything in his power to protect her? So I think when Rory’s tearing up, it isn’t just because he loves and admires the Doctor and is sympathizing with him, but because he’s empathizing with him, because he understands in that moment how he feels, more than anyone else in the universe probably could.” — Kati

doctor who eleventh doctor Rory Williams amy pond TARDIS

Captain Avery: Toby!Amy: Rory!Doctor: THE TARDIS!!!!!

Captain Avery: Toby!
Amy: Rory!
Doctor: THE TARDIS!!!!!

lmao doctor who TARDIS amy pond Rory Williams eleventh doctor