Deputy Editor at Upworthy. Currently of Baltimore, formerly of NYC and Pittsburgh. Nerd. Feminist. Comedy fan. TV enthusiast. Ally. Fangirl. Hoping to make the world a better place by blogging in my pajamas.

Here I am on Facebook & Twitter.

In my spare time, I write things for
I Spy A Famous Face.

Movies Watched in: 2012/2013/2014

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fandomsandfeminism:

ritchandspace:

tardiswanted:

Ladies and gentlemen, and variations thereupon

You know, I’m amazed that in all my time on tumblr, I’ve never seen a single post appreciating this lady. I mean, do you realise what is happening here?

This is clear and casual acceptance of gender non-conformity in mainstream media. And not only is this in Doctor Who, with an audience of millions and millions of people worldwide, but it’s also set in the future, implying that progress is not only spaceships and interplanetary colonisation, but also in the way of acceptance of identity outside the gender binary.

So yeah, let’s take a moment to appreciate the awesome lady in Doctor Who that was totally chill about trans* folk without making a big show of it. You go, girl*!
(*or gentleman, or variations thereof.)

Russell T Davies wrote these episodes, with these lines:

  • End of the World: Ladies and gentlemen and trees and multiforms…
  • The Long Game: Ladies, gentlemen, multi-sex, undecided or robot…
  • Midnight: Ladies and gentlemen, and variations thereupon…

In Russell T Davies’ futures, gender is always more complicated than today.  

Davies also created Jack Harkness, from a future (the 51st century) where sexuality is fluid (also Jack and the Face of Boe have both been said to carry pregnancies).  

On the other hand the Moffat years gave us this line:

"We’re the thin/fat, gay, Anglican marines: why would we need names as well?" 

Because its so funny and weird that out of hundreds of “anglican marines” in Demons Run in the 52nd century, that a fat guy and a thin guy would be a couple…ok….

And they’re literally credited at the end as “Fat One” and “Thin One”.   They’re purely a joke.

Is that how straight people see us?

Anyway, in the meantime (bringing us back to the original post), the fact that no one knew this Hostess’s name in “Midnight” is considered a major tragedy, because she is a hero.

(The episode also features a character named Sky who mentions her ex with she/her pronouns, and no one makes a big deal out of it.  Its entirely normal, and not a joke at all.)

Remember when I liked Doctor Who?

(Source: tardisvvanted)

sigh doctor who
"

I think the reason that lots of people think Steven Moffat’s version of Doctor Who is sexist is because it repeatedly acts and sounds sexist. It may be that Moffat consciously tries to craft his Who as feminist or pro-feminist. If so, I don’t think there’s any better illustration of the crucial point that, in a sexist society, however much of an ‘ally’ you may be, if you’re a man then you still enjoy male privilege, and probably don’t realise it half the time.

The Doctor describes Clara as “a mystery wrapped in an enigma squeezed into a skirt that’s just a little bit too tight”. The Doctor describes Marilyn Monroe as though she really was nothing more than the stereotypical ‘man crazy’ ditz she played in some of her movies. Rory likens being married to Amy to being trapped inside a giant robot duplicate of her. We get dialogue like “Why did she try to kill you and then want to marry you?” “Because she’s a woman”. Osgood, a scientist, is shown to be secretly obsessed with jealousy towards her prettier sister. A Dalek develops a female alter-ego, and she spends her time cooking.
[…]
In Moffat’s show, women are overwhelmingly defined by their traditional gender roles or bodily functions. It doesn’t matter that their excellence in these gender roles is praised by show and lead character. It doesn’t matter that we’re supposed to be impressed by the virtuosity with which River tricks people using her feminine wiles. It doesn’t change anything that the Doctor goes into rhapsodies about the wonders of motherhood. That isn’t liberating; it’s still the mapping of male, patriarchal conceptions of female value onto female characters.

River exists entirely because of the Doctor. Who the hell is River? She is an assemblage of gender essentialist tropes and wisecracks. When does she ever – beyond, arguably, her first appearance – behave like an academic or a scientist? When does she ever display anything resembling erudition or intellectual curiosity? When does she ever do or say anything to show or engender love? Admittedly, the Doctor seems to be sexually aroused by the way she shoots people… which is just charming. In ‘Let’s Kill Hitler’, she is incarnated as Mels, a character we’ve never seen or heard of before, and plonked unceremoniously into the story out of sheer, brazen convenience. She stalks Amy and Rory (her unwitting mother and father) for years, pretending to be their friend, all because of her pre-programmed monomaniacal desire to get to the Doctor. She regenerates while “concentrating on a dress size”. She spends the rest of the episode obsessing over her hair, clothes, shoes and weight. River’s instability is finally conquered by the love of a good man. This seems intensely hostile and patronising. If that isn’t what was aimed at, then somebody is a very bad shot.

It doesn’t matter that River is ‘powerful’. Fetishizing ‘power’ in women characters – having them kicking ass and always being ready with a putdown - isn’t the same as writing them as human beings.

"

Steven Moffat: a Case for the Prosecution

[…]The reason I feel ill when the Doctor snogs River’s ghost at the end of ‘Name of the Doctor’ is not that I hate emotion in Who, or that I want – because I’m a sexually and emotionally repressed nerd or something – Doctor Who to be emotionless.  Rather, the opposite of this is the truth.  The reason I feel ill at moments like that is rather that I hate fake emotion, cheap emotion, unearned emotion.  Commodified emotion.  Packaged, marketed, profitable, sugary, junk emotion.  Sentimentality, in other words. 

Sentimentality is disgusting because it’s not fundamentally about other people, or relationships.  It’s about oneself.  It’s self-regarding, self-comforting, self-pleasing.  It isn’t social.  It’s narcissistic.  This is precisely what is so horribly wrong with all those Moffatian emotional tornadoes.  How can they be touching when the characters and relationships are so shallow?  When we’re watching narcissists adoring their own reflections in their partner’s eyes?[…]
 I don’t like having to hate this show.  I want to love it.  

(via blake-wyatt)

Standing ovation for this entire post and everything it stands for.

doctor who fuck you steven moffat feminism sexism
burningupasun:

eastofgallifrey:

itsfuckingdistractingohgood:

eastofgallifrey:

University Study on Sexism in Doctor Who

"Fun fact, Rose’s Bechdal test score would have been in the 80′s were it not for the episodes Moffat wrote during her run."

Guys, really, you should click the link. 

“Ironically, the woman who is often propped up as proof that Steven Moffat is, in fact, not a sexist was one of the worst in terms of the Bechdel test and overall independence of thought and character. While maintaining an average speaking time, the episodes she is in only pass the Bechdel Test 57% of the time, and she herself only passes 42% of the time. She also never passes it on her own after Series 5. It is also important to note that River’s “passes” barely scraped by this test. Her passing conversations were always around three or four lines of exchange total, limited to one per episode, and were always in the presence of/with the Doctor.”

BAM.

burningupasun:

eastofgallifrey:

itsfuckingdistractingohgood:

eastofgallifrey:

University Study on Sexism in Doctor Who

"Fun fact, Rose’s Bechdal test score would have been in the 80′s were it not for the episodes Moffat wrote during her run."

Guys, really, you should click the link. 

Ironically, the woman who is often propped up as proof that Steven Moffat is, in fact, not a sexist was one of the worst in terms of the Bechdel test and overall independence of thought and character. While maintaining an average speaking time, the episodes she is in only pass the Bechdel Test 57% of the time, and she herself only passes 42% of the time. She also never passes it on her own after Series 5. It is also important to note that River’s “passes” barely scraped by this test. Her passing conversations were always around three or four lines of exchange total, limited to one per episode, and were always in the presence of/with the Doctor.”

BAM.

doctor who sexism facts fuck you steven moffat

Steven Moffat hires zero female writers for Doctor Who -- for the fourth season in a row.

whovianfeminism:

xekei:

whovianfeminism:

[cut for length]

Maybe the writers get their jobs because the head writer finds their work good?

Probably. And we all know women don’t write good sci-fi/fantasy TV.

Nope.

None.

Nothing to see here.

I got nothing.

I can’t think of a single one, ever.

NOPE. NEVER BEFORE. NO GOOD FEMALE WRITERS EVER IN THE SCIENCE FICTION GENRE.

(Source: hellotailor)

doctor who Steven Moffat science fiction
silentdimension:

Still the most amazing opening credits ever.

silentdimension:

Still the most amazing opening credits ever.

doctor who

themarysue:

running-right-off-the-track:

You can say what you want, Donna is my favourite companion.

Always reblog. 

donna noble doctor who

audreyii-fic:

Doctor Who 3x02 “The Shakespeare Code”

doctor who lol

daenystormborn:

Gif Meme

Martha Jones + Quotes (for anonymous)

Martha jones doctor who

would-you-like-a-jelly-baby:

blaixen:

(X)

Matt Smith could have been such a wonderful doctor… if Moffat hadn’t been writing the show.

woop there it is

Ya burnt. 

(Source: to-killl-a-mocking-jay)

fuck you Moffat doctor who queue
whovianfeminism:

burntlikethesun:

oh my god

Let’s see if we can do better.
10% Trying to figure out her family, because like, really, who were those two random people at Christmas dinner?
10% Thinking about what’s going on with Angie and Artie and wondering how they’re doing since she inexplicably and suddenly left them.
10% Wearing cool clothes. (I’ll give them that, I envy Clara’s fashion sense).
20% Planning future adventures with the Doctor and trying to schedule her journeys through time and space around weekends and school holidays.
20% Developing lesson plans for her students and trying to figure out how how to let them know their lit anthology’s description of Jane Austen is wrong without letting on she had tea with her last week.
30% Thinking about how to have a conversation with the Doctor about personal boundaries, respecting her enough to tell her vital information about her own life, and not doing things to her “for her own good.”

whovianfeminism:

burntlikethesun:

oh my god

Let’s see if we can do better.

  • 10% Trying to figure out her family, because like, really, who were those two random people at Christmas dinner?
  • 10% Thinking about what’s going on with Angie and Artie and wondering how they’re doing since she inexplicably and suddenly left them.
  • 10% Wearing cool clothes. (I’ll give them that, I envy Clara’s fashion sense).
  • 20% Planning future adventures with the Doctor and trying to schedule her journeys through time and space around weekends and school holidays.
  • 20% Developing lesson plans for her students and trying to figure out how how to let them know their lit anthology’s description of Jane Austen is wrong without letting on she had tea with her last week.
  • 30% Thinking about how to have a conversation with the Doctor about personal boundaries, respecting her enough to tell her vital information about her own life, and not doing things to her “for her own good.”
doctor who feminism clara oswald poor clara
"

Smith’s farewell turn is certainly the worst of the NuWho baton-passers. From the forced sub-Mork & Mindy shenanigans with cipher Clara’s cardboard family, to the eyeroll-inducing voiceovers, to the repetition of “Doctor who?,” to the Attack of the Killer Regeneration, it was pretty painful to watch. As Moffat checked off the boxes, explaining the lingering mysteries of Smith’s run (about the connection between the Silence and the exploding TARDIS, etc.), all I could think of was The Eight Deadly Words that doom all forms of storytelling: I don’t care what happens to these people.

But you know what? Matt Smith, man. In the middle of this train wreck, he does a bit with a severed Cyberman head that actually finds a heartstring. When Handles finally craps out and “dies,” Smith, in his late-middle-age makeup, calls his name a couple of times and stares at the thing. The look on his face evokes memories not just of the similarly robotic K-9, but also of all the other companions long gone. Another one, his face says. I’ve lost another one.

Smith is a wonderful actor and was perfectly cast as the Doctor. His successor, Peter Capaldi, is also a wonderful actor (after watching him F-bomb his way through In the Loop, I have to stop myself from ending my cell phone conversations, “Fuckity-bye!”) and, despite my disappointment at the role not going to a woman this time around, I believe that he is also perfectly cast as the Doctor.

If only the problems with this show had anything to do with the cast.

"
i will reblog this literally every time i see it on my dash doctor who

hippity-hoppity-brigade:

THE BEST WAY TO GO OUT: CONTINUING A RUNNING GAG.

(Source: fionaglenanne)

harriet jones prime minister doctor who queue

The Facts.

jackwillett:

The reason his RTD era stories were watchable.image

hahahahahaha fuck you moffat doctor who queue