Deputy Editor at Upworthy. Nerd. Feminist. Comedy fan. TV enthusiast. Ally. Fangirl. Hoping to make the world a better place by blogging in my pajamas.

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as entertaining as I do.

In my spare time, I write things for
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Movies Watched in: 2012/2013/2014

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If you have any Upworthy content, send it to me at rebecca[at]upworthy[dot]com
or send me a message me on Facebook.

Currently Living: In Baltimore, MD.

(Source: cdbsk)

i like this squirrel super squirrel superheroes queue
"

“Empowered” and “sexy” are not universally synonymous. That a woman is not a sex kitten does not mean that she’s any less comfortable or empowered or any of that stuff. See above, re: not a homogenous demographic. Stop making sexiness a universal demand. Let some characters be unsexy. And for f*ck’s sake, please, please stop drawing women who are injured, or dead, or being tortured, or punching bad guys, in sex-kitten pin-up poses. That is bad visual storytelling, and it is INCREDIBLY creepy. Let women be heroes for the sake of heroism. Women don’t have to be damaged or traumatized to be strong, or to want to make a difference. Corollary: Dropping rape into a backstory is not a panacea for making a female character complex and gritty.

Imagine you have a daughter. Imagine the kind of women you’d like her to want to grow up to be. Write them. Write women you’d want to be friends — really good friends — with. Write women you’d get in arguments with. Write women you’d be legitimately scared of. Write women like your mom, like your aunts, like your wife, like your friends, like your nieces and nephews and daughters and bosses and friends. We are not aliens… This, too, goes back to “doing things.” A lot of the time, male characters act, and female characters are acted upon. Let female characters make difficult choices — and sometimes choose wrong — and have struggles and the same real victories. Because without those things, they’re not characters; they’re just window dressing.

"
Rachel Edidin talks about portraying female superhero characters at Comic Alliance (via georgethecat)
this! sexism feminism women female characters superheroes

Dear Sir, Regarding Your Affection for A Compacted Catwoman

wheelr:

For all the chaps who are so upset, furious, offended, affronted that people mocked the Catwoman #0 cover, I have a few words of counsel.

First, please understand that the critics are not complaining that the cover is “too sexy”. Perhaps someone somewhere has said that the cover is “too sexy”, but I can’t find that person, so it’s not a common view let alone the consensus. Most comic readers probably agree that a character like Catwoman can’t be “too sexy”. She’s sexy and you know it.

In fact, I think most critics would agree that the cover isn’t sexy enough; indeed it’s not sexy at all. Catwoman should be considerably sexier than this chew toy-shaped carbuncle. But that’s subjective. Some people may find this fleshy bow-tie immensely sexy, and to each their own. I’m not attracted to women myself; if I were I’d like to think I’d prefer ones who don’t look like they’ve had a close encounter with a car crusher, but I respect your choices, sir. Good for you for having the confidence to stand up for your fetish.

The point is, “too sexy” is not the problem. I know that “this sex symbol is too sexy” is a nice easy position to pick a fight with, but it’s not what people are saying, and it’s simply not sporting to invent other people’s positions. The right to invent unlikely positions is strictly reserved for comic book artists.

Second, please recognise that no criticism of one piece of cheesecake is an attack on all cheesecake. Some people will and do attack all cheesecake, of course, but I will stand with you on the line against that assault, my friend, because I believe in cheesecake and I believe in your right to cheesecake. But most people are more nuanced than that; they may believe, for example, that women should sometimes be sexy femme fatales and sometimes be intelligent kick-ass lead heroes who never have to seduce anyone or endure sexual violence. We have names for these types of characters. We call them Superman, Batman, Spider-Man, et cetera.

You too can adopt a nuanced position. You too can acknowledge that a piece of work is bad without having to pack all your wank materials into black bags for the binmen. If you admit that this cover is bad - which it is, it really is - no-one is going to take your dog-eared Danger Girl collection to the local Sally Army for someone less enlightened to enjoy. Your freedom to enjoy visual representations of attractive women are not under threat. You will live to masturbate another day.

The point of criticising - or mocking - a cover like this is to flag bad art that embodies the comic industry’s tendency to reduce women to sexy sexy objects rather than elevate them as sexy sexy characters. That this cover was the work of Guillem March seems extraordinary, because he’s a skilled practitioner of the art of cheesecake. He’s built his reputation drawing glossily glamorous women. His ambition may have been his downfall here; he may have drawn Catwoman like this because he had a bold vision but couldn’t make it work on the page. The effort is laudable; the result is laughable. 

I don’t think that’s what happened. I think March drew this cover as a joke. I think he was seeing how far he could push the pursuit of T&A at the expense of anatomy; his blog and work both show that he finds that tension fascinating. I think he played a game of chicken with his editor, and I think he was surprised when the editor didn’t blink, and I think he decided not to blink either, and we all lost that game. I suspect he probably regrets letting this cover out into the world, because there’s a serious danger of it being the piece he’s most famous for, and he’s much better than this. But that’s just a theory. Maybe Guillem March stands behind this cover. Maybe this is serious work.

And yes, the cover to Catwoman #0 reduces the character to her sexual assets. But in a diverse and perfect world you can do that in an artful way; you can be sexy, elegant, playful. This is none of those things. This Catwoman is a knuckle of tit. She could have been grown in a pleasure lab for lonely men. She could change her name to Fleshlight Armstrong. This cover is insulting to women, not because it’s sexual, but because it’s bad. It’s also insulting to heterosexual men, but heterosexual men have apparently never minded an insult they can wank to.

Third; it is an impossible pose. Yes, I’ve seen the pictures that supposedly show real people in the same pose. I know you like to believe that everything you see in glamour photographs is real even though you know it isn’t true, but let’s go ahead and take those photos at face value. They still don’t show women in the same pose. The Catwoman cover shows a woman leaping through the air. The photos show women stretching against solid surfaces. Try flexing your fingers backwards. See if your fingers go any further back when you push them against a table. Right? Right. The photos also show a different angle. There’s a reason you can’t find an overhead shot with a woman in the Catwoman pose, with her boobs and her butt both sticking out; because it’s imposible. And you’ve looked at a lot of photos of women bending their spines. If that picture exists, it’s on your harddrive. You didn’t produce it, so I have to assume it doesn’t exist.

And you know what else is different about the Catwoman cover? Her head. I know you’re only looking at her boobs and her ass, but if you force your eyes to meet in the middle, you’ll see that her head is impossibly placed. Spines aren’t drain snakes. 

Fourth; you’re right, exaggerated anatomy is common in a lot of art. That does not place it beyond criticism. Art without response is just wallpaper, and even wallpaper sometimes merits criticism. Superhero art is especially ripe with anatomical implausibility. Sometimes it’s effective, but sometimes it isn’t, and when it isn’t we are allowed to call it out. You know how everyone mocked Rob Liefeld’s Heroes Reborn Captain America? You probably turned up to that party. Why didn’t you turn up to this one?

Fifth; I know you like to pretend that people only ever say that a thing is sexist because they want to be cool or popular or attractive to girls, but I think you know that’s not true. People talk about this stuff because it matters. It may stir up attention and it may increase circulation, but you have to understand that throwing bread to hungry people tends to cause a fuss.

You’ve never had to worry about getting scraps from someone else’s table. The culture serves you, sir. You are, and always have been, and always will be, the primary audience. Yet there are little corners of the world that serve other people - sometimes with you in the room, and sometimes when you’re out of it. And every time you notice it happening, you complain. 

Every time.

Every.

Time.

Every time the culture serves someone who isn’t you, and every time someone who isn’t you comments on culture, you moan, you jostle, you threaten, you splutter with indignation. “What is this? People are mocking the ample bosoms that I so enjoy? Fetch my blunderbuss.” And because the culture is almost always about you - so much so that you’ve never even consciously acknowledged it - you see anything that isn’t about you as a threat. But it’s not a threat. It’s not a mob, or a gang, or even a bandwagon. It’s just the rest of the world. And you’re not excluded from it; you’re just choosing not to participate because you know you’ll have to share the spotlight.

You are never going to stop being the primary audience. So put down the blunderbuss and throw the rest of the world some scraps from your table.

Sixth; saying you’re revolted, disgusted, angry that people are criticising such-and-such, that is a rhetorical trick that doesn’t work any more. “You’re offended by this art? Well I am literally vomiting with outrage that you would criticise my right to enjoy it! I’m sure if you had your way I would be flayed alive in the street, and that makes you no better than Jeffrey Dahmer”.

I know you learned this trick from actual minorities, the actually maligned with actual reasons to be outraged, and I know you’ve got some good mileage out of it, but you can’t be the majority and claim to be oppressed. Real life is not Fox News. Breathe in, breathe out.

(“You did not tell me to breathe in again; clearly you want me to suffocate, which is so typical of you liberal elites, always pretending to be tolerant and then trying to suffocate people who disagree with you!”)

And seventh; you’re right that we should all take some responsibility for how our culture shapes us. But if you grew up watching cartoons and never became a Thundercat, that doesn’t merit much applause. If you grew up watching cartoons with largely male ensembles and only limited roles for women, you may want to consider if that experience has contributed to your attitudes in any way.

I hope these notes have helped you to contextualise your feelings. 

Yours sincerely, et cetera.

catwoman guillem march dc comics superheroes cover art comics important sexism feminism
thedailywhat:

Heartwarming Tearjerker of the Day: Four-year-old comic book fan Anthony Smith is deaf in his right ear and has hearing damage in his left. He also refused to wear his hearing aid (which he calls “Blue Ear” because it is blue), because “superheroes don’t wear hearing aids.” So in a long-shot attempt to help her son, Anthony’s mom emailed Marvel for ideas.
“She didn’t know a specific person to write to here at Marvel, and even figured it might get caught in our spam filters, but she sent it in anyway, because that’s the kind of great parent Christina is,” said Marvel editor Bill Rosemann. “And it was her inspiring effort to help her son that touched so many of us here. As a fellow parent of a toddler, I can understand where she’s coming from, so I forwarded the email around the rest of Editorial, asking what we could do to help, and like when Cap yells, ‘Avengers Assemble,’ the gang leapt into action.”
Not only did Anthony receive an image of the superhero Hawkeye, who lost 80 percent of his hearing back in the ’80s and wore hearing aids — Anthony also received a drawing of a brand-new superhero: “Blue Ear.”
Now, with his hearing aid back in, Anthony is able to “fight battles and help people.” His preschool, for hearing-impaired kids, recently hosted a superhero week to inspire the students to overcome their limitations.
DON’T miss the video. It’s the best thing you’ll see all day.
[death+taxes / robot6]

thedailywhat:

Heartwarming Tearjerker of the Day: Four-year-old comic book fan Anthony Smith is deaf in his right ear and has hearing damage in his left. He also refused to wear his hearing aid (which he calls “Blue Ear” because it is blue), because “superheroes don’t wear hearing aids.” So in a long-shot attempt to help her son, Anthony’s mom emailed Marvel for ideas.

“She didn’t know a specific person to write to here at Marvel, and even figured it might get caught in our spam filters, but she sent it in anyway, because that’s the kind of great parent Christina is,” said Marvel editor Bill Rosemann. “And it was her inspiring effort to help her son that touched so many of us here. As a fellow parent of a toddler, I can understand where she’s coming from, so I forwarded the email around the rest of Editorial, asking what we could do to help, and like when Cap yells, ‘Avengers Assemble,’ the gang leapt into action.”

Not only did Anthony receive an image of the superhero Hawkeye, who lost 80 percent of his hearing back in the ’80s and wore hearing aids — Anthony also received a drawing of a brand-new superhero: “Blue Ear.”

Now, with his hearing aid back in, Anthony is able to “fight battles and help people.” His preschool, for hearing-impaired kids, recently hosted a superhero week to inspire the students to overcome their limitations.

DON’T miss the video. It’s the best thing you’ll see all day.

[death+taxes / robot6]

(Source: thedailywhat)

comics marvel the best superheroes
"

“Empowered” and “sexy” are not universally synonymous. That a woman is not a sex kitten does not mean that she’s any less comfortable or empowered or any of that stuff. See above, re: not a homogenous demographic. Stop making sexiness a universal demand. Let some characters be unsexy. And for f*ck’s sake, please, please stop drawing women who are injured, or dead, or being tortured, or punching bad guys, in sex-kitten pin-up poses. That is bad visual storytelling, and it is INCREDIBLY creepy. Let women be heroes for the sake of heroism. Women don’t have to be damaged or traumatized to be strong, or to want to make a difference. Corollary: Dropping rape into a backstory is not a panacea for making a female character complex and gritty.

Imagine you have a daughter. Imagine the kind of women you’d like her to want to grow up to be. Write them. Write women you’d want to be friends — really good friends — with. Write women you’d get in arguments with. Write women you’d be legitimately scared of. Write women like your mom, like your aunts, like your wife, like your friends, like your nieces and nephews and daughters and bosses and friends. We are not aliens… This, too, goes back to “doing things.” A lot of the time, male characters act, and female characters are acted upon. Let female characters make difficult choices — and sometimes choose wrong — and have struggles and the same real victories. Because without those things, they’re not characters; they’re just window dressing.

"
Rachel Edidin talks about portraying female superhero characters at Comic Alliance (via georgethecat)
all the applause feminism comics women female characters superheroes rape culture important issues female empowerment
yerawizardharry:

Fed up with abusive husbands and corrupt officials, India’s poorest women are banding together, taking up arms, and fighting back. Even more shocking than the pink saris they wear: Their quest for justice is actually working. In one of the most backward regions of India, the badlands of Central India, village women dressed in pink saris are getting togther to fight corruption and injustice and to raise their voices against the system.”Pink Gang” fights for the rights of women and other marginalized people in rural India.
(via recycleanimals/outofthewindow)




Superheros IRL. Fuck yeah.

yerawizardharry:

Fed up with abusive husbands and corrupt officials, India’s poorest women are banding together, taking up arms, and fighting back. Even more shocking than the pink saris they wear: Their quest for justice is actually working. In one of the most backward regions of India, the badlands of Central India, village women dressed in pink saris are getting togther to fight corruption and injustice and to raise their voices against the system.”Pink Gang” fights for the rights of women and other marginalized people in rural India.

(via recycleanimals/outofthewindow)

Superheros IRL. Fuck yeah.

india feminism womens rights superheroes pink gang awesome
lol female characters armor costumes accurate superheroes feminism
Superheroes are so gay! (Taken with instagram)

Superheroes are so gay! (Taken with instagram)

nyc my pics lgbtq nypride2011 superheroes
weesleyisourking:

And a million Trekkies suddenly yelled “engage”

weesleyisourking:

And a million Trekkies suddenly yelled “engage”

james mcavoy star trek superheroes
wedontgiveafrak:

Necessary Addition To Your Mantle of The Day: Batmoose.
[WDGAF via bwoup]

Who thinks of these things?

wedontgiveafrak:

Necessary Addition To Your Mantle of The Day: Batmoose.

[WDGAF via bwoup]

Who thinks of these things?

batman lol art fanart superheroes moose
mattlittle:

chrisreblogs:

mikescollins:

Wonder Woman: First look at Adrianne Palicki in costume — EXCLUSIVE PHOTO
Sorry, EW, but Party City scooped you on this in their last Halloween circular.
This gets an F- !

Oh my god.
What in the…?
Well, at least it makes the Green Lantern costume look good.
DC, you are doing it wrong.

Gonna have to disagree with everyone here - I give this two thumbs up. It retains the ideas behind the Wonder Woman design while not sacrificing the 21st century idea that a super hero costume should have some texturing that conveys protection. Not a fan of the logos on the boots (Alan Kistler has said [paraphrasing] that any hero that puts their own logo on their costume more than once is being insecure, and I agree). This is form-fitting which allows her to look sexy without looking like her super hero name is Tits McGee, which it would if they just dumped her in her stupid-ass bikini look. Seriously, imagine how weird it would be for a powerful, beautiful woman to save you from your imminent death in her fucking lingere. And imagine how weird the situation would be if she had to kick someone in the face and her puss fell out. It also incorporates the primary colors well, without selling out to the X-Men black leather suit idea.

I am all about the pants for practicality but this looks like it was picked up at a latex fetish shop. They should have gone with a darker color scheme (black pants at least) and a more durable material like leather or spandex instead of what appears to be a cheap vinyl halloween costume. This is too over the top. Plus, heels? Really?
I was holding out hope that this Wonder Woman series would be done right and that Diana Prince would be tough and capable and naturally beautiful without all the makeup, but if this costume is the standard they’re going for, I’m not feeling reassured at all. 

mattlittle:

chrisreblogs:

mikescollins:

Wonder Woman: First look at Adrianne Palicki in costume — EXCLUSIVE PHOTO

Sorry, EW, but Party City scooped you on this in their last Halloween circular.

This gets an F- !

Oh my god.

What in the…?

Well, at least it makes the Green Lantern costume look good.

DC, you are doing it wrong.

Gonna have to disagree with everyone here - I give this two thumbs up. It retains the ideas behind the Wonder Woman design while not sacrificing the 21st century idea that a super hero costume should have some texturing that conveys protection. Not a fan of the logos on the boots (Alan Kistler has said [paraphrasing] that any hero that puts their own logo on their costume more than once is being insecure, and I agree). This is form-fitting which allows her to look sexy without looking like her super hero name is Tits McGee, which it would if they just dumped her in her stupid-ass bikini look. Seriously, imagine how weird it would be for a powerful, beautiful woman to save you from your imminent death in her fucking lingere. And imagine how weird the situation would be if she had to kick someone in the face and her puss fell out. It also incorporates the primary colors well, without selling out to the X-Men black leather suit idea.

I am all about the pants for practicality but this looks like it was picked up at a latex fetish shop. They should have gone with a darker color scheme (black pants at least) and a more durable material like leather or spandex instead of what appears to be a cheap vinyl halloween costume. This is too over the top. Plus, heels? Really?

I was holding out hope that this Wonder Woman series would be done right and that Diana Prince would be tough and capable and naturally beautiful without all the makeup, but if this costume is the standard they’re going for, I’m not feeling reassured at all. 

wonder woman diana prince fail comics superheroes adrianne palicki

5-4-1:

Tommy: Hey, Billy.  Grab the others, I think I’ve found a replacement for Jason.
Billy: That’s great news, Tommy.  Who’d you— Oh Tommy, you idiot.  That’s just a statue.
Tommy: Is it?  Fine then, I’ve found a replacement for Trini.

This is so much funnier than I expected it to be. The Red Ranger shouting ‘Adolph Hitler’ to transform is going to stick with me forever (it’s around 1:00 in, if you don’t want to watch the whole thing). 

this made me laugh way too much power rangers hitler 90s mashup superheroes parody
77 Minimalist Villains
(via The High Definite)

77 Minimalist Villains

(via The High Definite)

minimalism villains superheroes
lettersfromtheattic:

costumedcrusader:

g33kgasm:

theblast:

Crisis on Earth Prime

This is some of the worst Cosplay I have seen… and I’ve seen some pretty bad Cosplay.
GTFOMD!

Eh I quite like it.
I like how there are like, 5 Batmans and only one of everyone else.

I actually really like it - I think everyone is showing a lot of dedication and their love of comics - some of these look quite complicated to put together, actually.

LOL! “I like how there are like, 5 Batmans and only one of everyone else.” ~costumedcrusader

lettersfromtheattic:

costumedcrusader:

g33kgasm:

theblast:

Crisis on Earth Prime

This is some of the worst Cosplay I have seen… and I’ve seen some pretty bad Cosplay.

GTFOMD!

Eh I quite like it.

I like how there are like, 5 Batmans and only one of everyone else.

I actually really like it - I think everyone is showing a lot of dedication and their love of comics - some of these look quite complicated to put together, actually.

LOL! “I like how there are like, 5 Batmans and only one of everyone else.” ~costumedcrusader

batman wonder woman superman superhero superheroes costume cosplay DC comics the joker
We’ve seen the Disney Princesses as comic book characters, art nouveau drawings, obese caricatures, and now, as superheroes.  
(via Disney Princess Superheroes)

We’ve seen the Disney Princesses as comic book characters, art nouveau drawings, obese caricatures, and now, as superheroes. 

(via Disney Princess Superheroes)

(Source: kreugan.deviantart.com)

buzzfeed disney disney princesses superheroes badass